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How to Help Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

The island of Puerto Rico has been battered by Hurricane Maria, leaving most of the residents without power, food, water or medicine. Since only 7% of power has been restored to the island, the citizens are unaware of the help from  FEMA. Simultaneously, FEMA is having trouble aiding some parts of the island because of many inaccessible areas due to flooding, fallen trees and the detachment of roads. 

A map of Puerto Rico showing the road status as of September 26, 2017. The text callouts from the upper left corner of the graphic going clockwise: Inaccessible due to mudslide at 140 km in the direction of Mayaguez towards Arecibo. Lanes towards Mayaguez being used in both directions. Inaccessible from 148.7 km to 142.8 km due to flooding in both directions. Inaccessible due to mudslide and detachment of road at 54.4 km. Detour by PR-603 and PR-6103. Signage, lightning, and fallen trees. Accessible in both directions. Inaccessible at 22.6 km due to structural concerns in both directions. Inaccessible at 4.1 km due to flooding in both directions. Inaccessible in three segments in San Juan direction. Lanes toward Fajardo being used in both directions. Inaccessible in three segments in San Juan direction. Lanes towards Fajardo being used in both directions. Closed in direction to Caguas. Lanes towards Fajardo used in both direction. Inaccessible at 93.9 km towards Ponce. Emergency lane towards Caguas being used in opposite direction. Inaccessible due to structural damage of bridge at 1 km. Inaccessible at 200 km in both directions due to flood. Lanes towards Mayaguez being used in both directions. Inaccessible due to mudslide at 12.6 km. Inaccessible from 148.7 km to 142.km due to flooding in both directions.

<https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/images/143781>

Food, water, and medicine are also issues, as many elderly people are saying “they don’t want to die here” and “we only have a few slices of bread left.” Thankfully, water is becoming more accessible, and 45% of the island has received clean drinking water. However, the people who have not received aid are forced to purchase water, which at six dollars a bottle is too expensive for most to afford. As for medicine, clinics are closed because there is nearly no gas on the island, and the generators people own are powered by diesel. Clinics are closed, and only 139 shelters are open for the entire population of Puerto Rico. Here is one possible way to support our brothers and sisters in Christ.

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<http://siembravida.org/>

Siembra Vida is a Christian organization with the goal of rehabilitating people with problems such as drug addiction, by teaching them the basics of agriculture. The farm is located in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, and while the area was mostly destroyed, the farm remained untouched and in good condition.

Image may contain: sky, plant, tree, grass, outdoor and nature
Photo credits to Tiffany Hernandez

Therefore, this organization has decided to become a crisis center and provide meals and basic supplies such as water, personal hygiene items, and medicine to the citizens who need help. However, they need aid because most of the items need to be shipped into the country ,and they need large amounts of resources for the number of people they expect.

If you desire to help out this new crisis center, donate through the links below. The Amazon link is for buying resources such as water, clothing and personal hygiene items. The second option is to donate directly to the organization Siembra Vida. The page is in Spanish, so if you would like to donate directly to the organization, click on “Donar” which means donate.

<https://www.amazon.com/baby-reg/CSAZEDK3N52>

<http://siembravida.org/participa>

Facebook Page for updates from the organization: https://www.facebook.com/siembravidapr/

If you have questions, feel free to contact my family and me. We are working closely with the founder of Siembra Vida. Contact: sarai.morato1@gmail.com.

 

References

Dorell, Oren. USA Today, Gannett Satellite Information Network, 1 Oct. 2017, www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2017/09/30/puerto-rico-by-the-numbers/720731001/.

Dorell, Oren. “With long lines for food, water and fuel and no electricity, Puerto Ricans help each other.” USA Today, Gannett Satellite Information Network, 1 Oct. 2017, <www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2017/10/01/puerto-rico-want-and-generosity/720663001/.>

Francis, Enjoli. “With little food, water or power, Puerto Rico residents say ‘no one has come’ to help.” ABC News, ABC News Network, <abcnews.go.com/US/food-water-power-puerto-rico-residents/story?id=50266077.>

“Puerto Rico Road Status as of September 28, 2017.” Puerto Rico Road Status as of September 28, 2017 | FEMA.Gov, <www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/images/143781.>

“Siembra Vida.” Siembra Vida, <siembravida.org/.>

2 Comments

  1. Of course, you could always just do what Lin Manuel-Mirada did . ..